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Chronic Procrastination
#1
I've heard that a good deal of my fellow INTPs suffer from what I would deem "chronic procrastination" - Including myself.

Currently I'm an online student in my senior year of High School - And I'm well known as the procrastinator of the group; I'm currently about 2 months behind on my schoolwork and usually spend the last month before the end of a semester nearly killing myself to get all of my work in on time. I've tried several different approaches to getting my procrastination under control, but they seldom have any effect at all.

I know that many of us INTPs procrastinate because we don't care and have no inspiration to do the task(s) at hand; and that's exactly my problem.

Any advice?
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#2
There's a new internet craze called "gamification," that involves turning tasks that are boring/loathsome into a game to entice yourself to be excited about them... This I have found useful, but it is nothing new; parents and guardians have used this concept for ages (Mary Poppins, anyone?)
"Well if I were You-Know-Who, I'd want you to feel cut off from everyone else. Because if it's just you alone you're not as much of a threat." -Luna Lovegood
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#3
If I had a solution I'd be using it. Might I suggest setting your own deadlines? As in, it seems you have some success in finishing things last minute, if you could find a way to convince yourself that it was due earlier, you would finish then, instead. Anyway, that's the best I've got.
-Yordle Sandwich
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#4
Here's what helps me the most: Breaking a project up into separate steps and assigning each step it's own due date.
So if I had a 10 page paper due March 11th, I'd plan something like this:
March 2: Find books, articles, and a documentary on topic
March 3-5: Take notes on sources
March 6: Have outline and thesis ready
March 8: Have 5 pages written
March 9: Have 8 pages
March 10: Finish paper, works cited

Of course, being a procrastinator, you could easily miss each deadline you set for yourself. But it does give you a basic idea of how much time the project could take. Normally, you might make it to March 8th without having started at all, but since you've got all this written down, Procrastinator's Panic starts to set in around March 4th when you haven't even visited the library yet.
And ideally, if you actually follow your plan, you're in for a high-quality, low-stress project!
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#5
(03-01-2016, 11:24 PM)PallasAthena Wrote: Here's what helps me the most: Breaking a project up into separate steps and assigning each step it's own due date.
So if I had a 10 page paper due March 11th, I'd plan something like this:
March 2: Find books, articles, and a documentary on topic
March 3-5: Take notes on sources
March 6: Have outline and thesis ready
March 8: Have 5 pages written
March 9: Have 8 pages
March 10: Finish paper, works cited

Of course, being a procrastinator, you could easily miss each deadline you set for yourself. But it does give you a basic idea of how much time the project could take. Normally, you might make it to March 8th without having started at all, but since you've got all this written down, Procrastinator's Panic starts to set in around March 4th when you haven't even visited the library yet.
And ideally, if you actually follow your plan, you're in for a high-quality, low-stress project!
I admire your discipline! Big Grin

I have to admit, I've never thought of this, even when some school projects were posed in this way (citations due on the 5th, outline on the 8th, first draft by the 12th, etc).

But now that I'm no longer in school, I have to say if I set myself a schedule like the one you list above, I'd probably find myself finding books/articles on the 3rd, then notes/sources/outline on the 6th, then 8pgs on the 9th..... skipping entirely the steps between due to playing "catch-up" motivated by having missed a self-imposed deadline. Tongue

(actually, I'd probably do all the pages on the 9th and turn it in early only to get it back with a mark down indicating that I forgot to attach the citations page entirely)
"Well if I were You-Know-Who, I'd want you to feel cut off from everyone else. Because if it's just you alone you're not as much of a threat." -Luna Lovegood
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#6
In both school & work I've always completed my projects or work immediately. I always considered it my intp super power to be able to come up with or find out enough to make the powers who impose deadlines more than happy. Then I get all that extra time to learn what I want, without giving another thought to deadlines.
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