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which career is best?
#1
Rainbow 
Help! Huh I don't know what to major in in college. I could really use some fresh eyes and educated opinions. I'm an INTP so naturally I'm very analytic and introverted. My friends often say that I would bring logic to a gun fight (and consequentially die) My teachers would call me smart or quiet, often both. Blush I'm very good at math, English, science, art... pretty much anything academic or creative. I love systems and seeing how things can be more effective. I could learn about anything interesting for hours (spends 5 hours googling the origins of string theory...completely normal) Stupidity annoys me, monotony is as dull as the government is dysfunctional, and small talk/ shallowness is my kryptonite. Dodgy I've thrown around the idea of majoring in engineering or architecture but I know they aren't very female prevalent fields (btw ya i'm a girl INTP, basically the equivalent to a unicorn apparently) I've been encouraged to be a pharmacist or doctor by my parents... So ya ANY feed back would be gladly accepted and I'm open to objective criticism. thank you so much everyone Big Grin
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#2
Intp girl here as well. As cliched as it sounds, you should pursue what interests you. Personally, I love programming. It gives me a chance to exercise my analytical skills but also enjoy the challenge it offers. Plus, since I have issues staying focused on one general career, I can apply programming to a variety of careers fields. Given that, if an intp is not amused by the area they are studying, I doubt they vet far in that career.
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#3
Engineering is cool, you get to wield your INTP super powers almost on a daily basis. Big Grin
A possible downside would be that it's a male dominated environment, it's something you need to be able to handle as a female. If you're a girly-girl you might get a really hard time in such an environment, but since you're INTP is guess you're not really the girly-girl type so you should do fine.
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#4
You could try something in IT but with more of a project manager type bend...it gives that nice "I want to come up with a bunch of awesome ideas...and then let someone else figure out the execution of it while I move on to a new project" bend. Maybe web developer? Software or other engineer? Data analyst? Actuary?

I would think pharmacist would be Hell on Earth for an INTP. Talk about routine...
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#5
If you're just starting out, I suggest that you don't declare a major. Instead, take a year or so to basically just sign up for classes that fulfill your General Ed requirements, and try to vary them across as many different disciplines as you can. You'll soon find you have more fun in some classes than in others, and want to take more of those. Take more of the ones that are fun, and major in whatever that happens to be. Smile
"Well if I were You-Know-Who, I'd want you to feel cut off from everyone else. Because if it's just you alone you're not as much of a threat." -Luna Lovegood
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#6
I didn't decide on my major until I was more than halfway through college, and even then I didn't know what I wanted to do, it was just the thing I wanted to study most out of the choices I had (I guess there were 2 I was equally interested in and I picked the one that seemed more practical). It wasn't until a year or more after I finished college that I found something I really wanted to pursue and then I went to grad school for it. So you've got time. So long as you do something in the meantime you can take your time finding a direction you want to go. I had the opportunity to take a wide variety of classes in college - social science, hard science, arts, languages - and then I took more classes in the ones I found interesting, so that's what I'd recommend doing if you can. The things I ended up liking most were things I was hardly aware existed when I started college.

Also there are two pieces to think about - what topics you're interested in and what kind of work you like doing. If there's a topic you're interested in, there are a lot of ways you can be involved in it and those involve different kinds of work. Like say you like music. You could be a musician, but you could also produce music, sell music, advertise music, teach music, research the physics of sound, etc. I have a friend who studied economics, but what she eventually realized is that she really just likes working with data. She's interested in economics, but mainly she just wants to play around with giant data sets in excel, and it doesn't matter what the data is about. So my advice is, when you're thinking about whether to be a doctor or an architect or whatever, think about whether you're interested in health/medicine vs. architecture but also think about whether you'd like to do the things those people do on a daily basis, like interacting with patients vs. sitting at a computer working in software that architects use, or whatever.
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#7
No need to listen to anyone if you are told that some kind of profession is better. I repeatedly spoke and even wrote on Educating Essays what profession should be chosen for its interests. After all, if you engage in the fact that you are not interested then over time you will hate your work and it will lower your productivity. As they say, do what you love and love, what you do.
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